Google Nexus 7 Review

Nexus 7 proved to be a huge success for Google. This was important for them to make a headway in the tablet market, no doubt, still ruled by iPad. A lot of Android tablet manufacturers could not even challenge the supremacy of the iPad due to concerns around fragmentation issues which exist within the Android ecosystem. And previous versions of Android OS simply lacked the ease of use factor which iOS has always been proud of.

So how does Nexus 7 stack up to these expectations that previous Android tablets have not been able to achieve?

My iPad 2 was gathering dust by now as my fascination for iOS experience had faded away after I started using Android OS first via Samsung Galaxy SII and then Galaxy Note. I sold my iPad and when I decided to switch over to Nexus 7 (you may probably think of this as a downgrade) I did consider Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 7.0 for once, however I wanted to skip Sammy on this one as they are very slow in releasing Android OS upgrades even on their flagship devices while they keep tuning it for their proprietary TouchWiz interface compatibility and SGT 2 7.0 scores came out well below Galaxy Note while I was running some benchmark tests on my phone.

Nexus 7 is officially not available in UK yet, so by the time I planned to order via a relative in USA, it was sold out online and in stores, so I chose to order via E Bay. My shipment was delivered within 15 to 20 days, in good condition and hassle free. Luckily I did not have too many issues un-boxing Nexus 7 with the kind of videos I watched on YouTube showing how difficult it was to get the tablet out of the packaging material used by Asus.

Nexus 7 tablet measures 198.5 x 120 x 10.45mm (l x h x w) and weighs 340 gm. It surely packs a premium feel to the build quality and a rubberised back which feels like thick textured plastic but allows better grip while holding the tablet. It also does away with the worry of your tablet picking up scratches or dirt smudges on the rear section with frequent use.

Overall look of the tablet is very minimal, no physical buttons below the lower bezel with the one similar to home screen button on theĀ iPad. There is a power button with volume rocker on the top right hand side of the tablet, and has decent bezel space.

Nexus 7 does not have a rear camera. However there is a front-facing 1.2 mp camera with light sensor which can be used for video calls/conferencing. Surprisingly the placement of 3.5 mm headphone connector is towards the lower section of the tablet and not on the top, which is slightly intrusive while using tablet in portrait mode.

Nexus 7 scores high on portability, it cannot fit in your regular day to day apparel but it is easy to carry around in a sleeve case and would probably fit well in your suit or rear pocket in your jeans.